The Company’s newest directors – Graham Holdaway, of Buninyong, Victoria, and Shauna Black, of Kingscote, Kangaroo Island – joined chairman Paul McKenzie, managing director John Sergeant and company secretary Vicky Allinson on an inspection of the Company’s assets.Timber port ‘now inevitable’
Nanjing Night Net

The directors of Kangaroo Island Plantation Timbers (KIPT) believe the construction of a deep-water port to ship harvested pine and bluegum from Kangaroo Island is now inevitable.

After its annual general meeting in Adelaide on September 8, the Company’s directors spent two days on Kangaroo Island, as they continue to work on securing a port and a route to market for the plantation timber on the island.

The Company’s newest directors – Graham Holdaway, of Buninyong, Victoria, and Shauna Black, of Kingscote, Kangaroo Island – joined chairman Paul McKenzie, managing director John Sergeant and company secretary Vicky Allinson on an inspection of the Company’s assets. These include 2700 hectares of pine plantations, 2300 hectares of bluegums, the Timber Creek mill, a potential port site at Smith Bay and other land. The standing timber translates to 807,000 cubic metres of pine and 403,000 cubic metres of blue gum.

Mr McKenzie said the directors were pleased that the Commissioner for Kangaroo Island Wendy Campana had accepted their invitation to visit some of the sites and hear more about forestry on Kangaroo Island.

The Company’s newest directors – Graham Holdaway, of Buninyong, Victoria, and Shauna Black, of Kingscote, Kangaroo Island – joined chairman Paul McKenzie, managing director John Sergeant and company secretary Vicky Allinson on an inspection of the Company’s assets.

“The Board is determined to monetize the Company’s land and timber assets, by developing them into a sustainable timber-growing and exporting business,” Mr McKenzie said.

“Also, KIPT is keen to work with the other major timber owner on Kangaroo Island towards a port solution, which we believe is now inevitable.

“For a variety of reasons we believe that the site at Smith Bay, owned by our Company, is the best place for a deep-water port but we are happy to consider other sites.

“We have two priorities regarding the port. First, we are calling for a transparent process in the analysis and consideration of a new port site by the State Government.

“Second, we want fair access (including fair pricing) to any port facilities which are developed, not just for us but for other commodity exports and imports, such as grain or fuel,” Mr McKenzie said. “That will be the best solution for Kangaroo Island.”

Commissioner Wendy Campana said the recent visit had been a good opportunity for her to learn more.

“Plantation forestry has the potential to be an important ongoing industry for Kangaroo Island, providing employment and boosting economic activity. Residents have waited for many years to see the benefits from the timber industry and now, with a port in sight, there is every reason to believe those benefits will be realised,” Ms Campana said.

For more information about Kangaroo Island Plantation Timbers visit the website 梧桐夜网kipt南京夜网419论坛.

The Company’s newest directors – Graham Holdaway, of Buninyong, Victoria, and Shauna Black, of Kingscote, Kangaroo Island – joined chairman Paul McKenzie, managing director John Sergeant and company secretary Vicky Allinson on an inspection of the Company’s assets.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.